Redistricting 2021

City of Fairfield Redistricting Process 2021

What do the existing council districts look like?
You can find a map of the City’s current council districts here (http://www.fairfield.ca.gov/gov/city_clerk/district_elections/district_elections_2019.asp)

And here is the link for the Fairfield Interactive Review map. For now it only has the current districts and the census blocks (zoom in to see the population counts for each Census Block).

Every ten years, local governments use new census data to redraw their district lines to reflect how local populations have changed. Assembly Bill 849 (2019) requires cities and counties to engage communities in the redistricting process by holding public hearings and/or workshops and doing public outreach, including to non- English-speaking communities. The City of Fairfield is asking for your help to plan, draw, and redivide new City districts.


The finalized maps that you will help us create will define the six City of Fairfield district borders, and these new districts will impact how you elect your councilmembers for the next 10 years.

Our primary goal when developing election districts is to draw lines that respect neighborhood, history and geographical elements. So we want to know: What do you consider the boundaries of your neighborhood? 

Flyer in English

Flyer in Spanish

Flyer in Tagalog

 

  Información en español

   Impormasyon sa Tagalog

Redistricting Schedule

DATE

ACTION

MEDIA

Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Regular City Council Meeting
6:00 P.M.
Council Chamber
1000 Webster Street

Introduction to the redistricting process presentation.

PowerPoint Presentation

Press Release in English, Spanish, Tagalog

City Council Meeting Recording

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Regular City Council Meeting

6:00 P.M.

Council Chamber

1000 Webster Street

First pre-draft-map hearing

Provide information on the process and solicit public input on communities of interest.

City Council Meeting Recording

Notice of 1st and 2nd Public Hearing English

Aviso de primera y segunda audiencia pública en español

Una at Pangalawang paunawa sa publikong pagdinig sa Tagalog

Agenda Report

Presentation

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Regular City Council Meeting

6:00 P.M.

Council Chamber

1000 Webster Street

Second pre-draft-map hearing

Provide information on the process and solicit public input on communities of interest.

Notice of 1st and 2nd Public Hearing English

Aviso de primera y segunda audiencia pública en español

Una at Pangalawang paunawa sa publikong pagdinig sa Tagalog

Around October 1

2021 Redistricting data released by California Statewide Database

Thursday, October 7, 2021

Community Meeting

6:00 – 8:00 P.M.

Community Center

1000 Kentucky Street

Lakeside A

Community meeting to receive public input and answer questions.

Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Regular City Council Meeting

6:00 P.M.

Council Chamber

1000 Webster Street

First post-draft-map hearing

Public and council input on initial draft maps.

Maps posted at least 7 days prior to hearing.

January 18, 2022

Regular City Council Meeting

6:00 P.M.

Council Chamber

1000 Webster Street

Second post-draft-map hearing and plan adoption.

Public and council deliberation on map options.

Council votes for preferred map.

April 17, 2022

Statutory deadline for council to adopt a map.

 

Language interpretation and requests for disability-related modification or accommodation, including auxiliary aids or devices, may be arranged by emailing a request to districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov at least 72 hours prior to the meeting.

Para solicitartraducción del idioma o una modificación por discapacidad, incluso los soportesauxiliares y los dispositivos, se puede mandar un correoelectrónico a districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov al menos 72 horas antes de la reunión.

What is redistricting?

 Redistricting determines which neighborhoods and communities are grouped together into a district for purposes of electing Councilmembers. The City Council will seek input in selecting the next district map for electing Councilmembers. You have an opportunity to share with the City Council how you think district boundaries should be drawn to best represent your community either during the public hearings or by submitting comments to districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov.

Why does redistricting matter to me?

Redistricting determines which neighborhoods and communities are grouped together into a district for purposes of electing a councilmember.

The City Council will seek input in selecting the next district map for our City Council. You have an opportunity to share with the City Council how you think district boundaries should be drawn to best represent your community.

You can contact the City Clerk’s Office at districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov to find out more about how the process works.  

 

How can I get involved?

The City Council will be holding hearings to receive public input on where district lines should    be drawn. Share your specific thoughts, draw a map, or attend our workshop to get involved!

  • Submit written testimony about the process or a specific map to districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov
  • See the calendar of workshops and public hearings at which you can speak about the process or a specific map.

At the hearings and workshop, we want you to:

  • Share your story
  • Define your neighborhood or community of interest
  • Explain why redistricting is relevant to your community
  • Get the tools you need to draw a map of one district or all six districts
  • Share your opinions of the draft maps
  • Talk to your neighbors and local organizations

Written Public Comments Submitted

You can also submit public comments, including suggested draft maps, by emailing: districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov

Map Drawing

Coming soon will be public mapping tools to assist the public in drawing maps. There are different tools for different purposes, and different tools for different levels of technical skill and interest.

What are Communities of Interest?

A community of interest is a “contiguous population that shares common social and economic interests that should be included within a single district for purposes of its effective and fair representation.”

Below are useful excerpts from the Local Government Redistricting Toolkit by Asian Americans Advancing Justice - Asian Law Caucus (2020)

Communities of interest are the overlapping sets of neighborhoods, networks, and groups that share interests, views, cultures, histories, languages, and values and whose boundaries can be identified on a map.

The following elements help define communities of interest:

  • shared interests in schools, housing, community safety, transit, health conditions, land use, environmental conditions, and/or other issues;
  • common social and civic networks, including churches, mosques, temples, homeowner associations, and community centers, and shared use of community spaces, like parks and shopping centers;
  • racial and ethnic compositions, cultural identities, and households that predominantly speak a language other than English;
  • similar socio-economic status, including but not limited to income, home-ownership, and education levels;
  • shared political boundary lines from other jurisdictions, such as school districts, community college districts, and water districts.

What do the acronyms and categories mean on the demographic sheets?

Common acronyms demographic categories:

NH: Non-Hispanic

VAP: Voting age population

CVAP: Citizen Voting Age Population

CVRA: California Voting Rights Act

FAIR MAPS Act:  Fair And Inclusive Redistricting for Municipalities and Political Subdivisions

NDC: National Demographics Corporation (the firm hired to produce the maps and provide demographic data)

Do I have to submit a completed map?

No, you do not need to submit a fully completed map.  You can draw boundaries for only your neighborhood or only a portion of the city.  It is helpful if you submit written commentary with your map describing why the particular neighborhood or area should be kept together in a single district.

Can I submit more than one map?

Yes, you may submit more than one map. Please draw as many maps as you like.  We suggest you submit only your top 2-3 preferred maps to assist the City Council in focusing on the map that best represents your community; however, there is no limit.

What happens to the drafted maps?

After you submit your map, the demographic consultants will generate the population and other demographic details for your proposed map. Maps can be viewed on the Draft Maps page or on the Interactive Review Map.

Once submitted, maps are considered public records.

Where can I learn more about redistricting?

Online publications and guides to redistricting:

From MALDEF, the NAACP and the Asian Justice Center

From the Asian Americans Advancing Justice

From the Brennan Center

From the League of Women Voters

From the California Independent Redistricting Commission FAQs 

Where can I find out more?

Please send any questions, comments, and map suggestions to Districtelections@fairfield.ca.gov; or contact the City by phone at (707) 428-7402.